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Thursday, October 22, 2020 | History

3 edition of Entomophaga maimaiga in North America found in the catalog.

Entomophaga maimaiga in North America

Richard C. Reardon

Entomophaga maimaiga in North America

a review

by Richard C. Reardon

  • 245 Want to read
  • 20 Currently reading

Published by Appalachian Integrated Pest Management in [Morgantown, W. Va.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gypsy moth -- North America,
  • Forest insects -- North America

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesGypsy moth fungus.
    StatementRichard Reardon, Ann Hajek.
    SeriesAIPM technology transfer
    ContributionsHajek, Ann., Appalachian Integrated Pest Management (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination22 p. :
    Number of Pages22
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17095138M
    OCLC/WorldCa36195951

    The fungal pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga has caused extensive mortality in gypsy moth populations in the northeastern U.S. but its activity is not always predictable. We will produce this fungus in the laboratory and release it in specific areas to determine the extent to which weather and site and stand factors affect establishment, persistence and activity of this pathogen.   The moth-killing fungus Entomophaga maimaiga, also known as Em, was imported from its native Japan to the Boston area in and again in in the hope that it would kill gypsy moths here, but those introductions failed. For the next 75 years, the damage caused by gypsy moths continued to grow and was especially devastating to oak trees.

      Abstract. The gypsy moth fungal pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga Humber, Shimazu, & Soper was first reported in North America in but did not occur in areas more recently colonized by gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.). To establish this pathogen along the leading edge of spreading gypsy moth populations, 6 × 10 5 E. maimaiga resting spores were Cited by: Entomophaga maimaiga is a major natural enemy in endemic Asian gypsy moth populations where spectacular epizootics have been reported yielding mortalities of up to 99%. Curiously, there are very few records of entomophthoralean fungi attacking the gypsy moth populations in Europe, although an epizootic in Poland has been described.

    spread of Entomophaga maimaiga (Zygomycetes: Entomophthorales) in gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) populations in North America. Environmental Entomology 23 71 0 Forests area infested by L. dispar (x 1, Cited by: 2. Field identification of the gypsy moth fungus, Entomophaga maimaiga. USDA, Forest Service NE Area, NA-PR Reardon, R. and A.E. Hajek. Entomophaga maimaiga in North America: A review. USDA, Forest Service, AIPM Technology Transfer. USDA, Forest Service NA-TP Ann E. Hajek Department of Entomology Cornell University Ithaca, NY.


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Entomophaga maimaiga in North America by Richard C. Reardon Download PDF EPUB FB2

From E. maimaiga epizootics occurring in North American gypsy moth populations in andit became clear that this fungus was capable of becoming an important mortality factor.

Whereas nuclear polyhedrosis viral epidemics in gypsy moth populations require a high population density, E. maimaiga can cause epizootics at lower densities. In release studies. The gypsy moth fungus Entomophaga maimaiga in North America (FHTET) Unknown Binding – January 1, by Richard C Reardon (Author)Author: Richard C Reardon.

8/07 Entomophaga maimaiga and gypsy moth in North America: Toward predicting epizootics. Annual Meeting, Society for Invertebrate Pathology, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. 6/07 Persistence and transmission of a fungal disease of gypsy moth. Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease Conference, Ithaca, New York (Poster presentation).

Entomophaga maimaiga was originally described from northern Asia and was first discovered infecting Lyman-tria dispar, the gypsy moth, in North America in Previ-ously, relatively little was known of this pathogen from north-* Mailing address: Department of Cited by: Entomophaga maimaiga was originally described from northern Asia and was first discovered infecting Lymantria dispar, the gypsy moth, in North America in Previously, relatively little was known of this pathogen from northern Asia, and the majority of publications described epizootics in L.

dispar populations in Japan (3, 82,).Cited by: An entomopathogenic fungus, Entomophaga maimaiga, was found causing an extensive epizootic in outbreak populations of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, throughout many forested and residential areas of the northeastern United States.

This is the first Cited by: promise is a fungal pathogen, Entomophaga maimaiga. Origin of Entomophaga maimaiga Entomophaga maimaiga is a common disease in gypsy moth populations in its native country of Japan.

The fun- gus was first released into the United States near Boston in as part of a program to introduce natural enemies of gypsy Size: 2MB. Nondormancy in Entomophaga maimaiga azygospores: effects of isolate and cold exposure Ann E. Flajek Alison E.

Burke Charlotte Nie1seu Joshua f. I Ian nain established ill North America through-out most of the range of gypsy moth (Nielsen ci al ). When an F. maimaiga azvgospore gerolillates a genii t abe grows upward and one germ. Since the s, the fungus Entomophaga maimaiga has also had a large impact on gypsy moth populations in North America.

Weather conditions can affect the survival and development of gypsy moth life stages, regardless of population density. I have worked extensively with the fungal pathogen, Entomophaga maimaiga, first seen in North America in and which has been providing natural control of gypsy moth, a major invasive pest of northeastern North American forests for over years.

the Russian Far East. maimaiga was introduced in North America in Today it is very significant pathogen of gypsy moth in North America and in Canada. Entomophaga maimaiga Humber, Shimazu, and Soper (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae)is ahighlyvirulent occurrence ofthis fungal pathogen in North America.

Our observations onthe morphology, development, and pathol-ogyofthe fungus in native gypsymothsare consistent with. The Cinderella story of biological control is the introduction of the fungus Entomophaga maimaga (Zygomycota: Entomophthorales) to control gypsy moth caterpillars in northeastern North America.

The gypsy moth became established here inand its fuzzy caterpillars eat the leaves of a wide range of plants and trees (though they prefer oaks).

Research Issue. One of the great mysteries of gypsy moth (GM) in eastern North America is the origin of the fungus Entomophaga maimaiga, now the dominant natural enemy of GM. This fungus is in the order Entomophthorales, which are mostly insect pathogens, and “maimaiga” is the Japanese word for “gypsy moth.” In Japan, where E.

The gypsy moth fungal pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga Humber, Shimazu, & Soper was first reported in North America in but did not occur in areas more recently colonized by gypsy moth, Lymantria.

Entomophaga maimaiga is a Japanese fungus which has shown striking success in managing Gypsy Moth populations in North America. "Maimaiga" is the Japanese word for "Gypsy Moth".

Genetic diversity in the gypsy moth fungal pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga from founder populations in North America and source populations in Asia. The fungal pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga, originating from Japan, first reported in North America in and probably accidentally introduced, also causes dramatic epizootics in both low and high density gypsy moth populations; activity of this fungus is determined, at least in part, by environmental conditions.

Several species of Cited by: Entomophaga maimaiga is a naturally occurring fungal pathogen specific to larvae of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar.E. maimaiga is thought to be native to Asia where its epizootics can suppress gypsy moth outbreaks.

However, in the USA this beneficial fungal pathogen was not observed untilalthough an isolate of E. maimaiga from Tokyo was released in Cited by: Ingypsy moths infected with E.

maimaiga were discovered in Connecticut (Andreadis and Weseloh, ), the first report of this fungus in North America.

In andE. maimaiga was introduced in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, and demonstrated “spectacular spread” (Hajek et al., ). Discovery of Entomophaga maimaiga in North American gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 87 (7): Barbosa P, Greenblatt J.

Suitability, digestibility and assimilation of various host plants of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar L (Lepidoptera.Entomophaga maimaiga: A Fungal Pathogen of Gypsy Moth in the Limelight.

Ann E. Hajek Department of Entomology Cornell University Ithaca, NY (prepared from the videotaped presentation*) The use of fungi to control gypsy moth is a much younger field of study than many of the systems we've talked about so far in this conference.maimaiga system.

Gypsy moth, L. dispar, is native in temperate Asia and across Europe. This pest was intro- duced to North America from Europe in or (Forbush and Fernald, ) and has become the most important defoliator of broad-leaved trees in eastern North America. In recent years, accidental introductionsCited by: